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edirectoryfreeradius

eDirectory en FreeRadius

Installatie verslag om eDirectory en FreeRadius te laten samenwerken

Omgeving en installaties

Server naam: OESNW.shift.local IP-adres: 192.168.177.10 .admin.n-team: beheer Taak: edir met ldap en radius support Geïnstalleerd volgens dit installatieverslag. Server naam: sles10.shift.local IP-adres: 192.168.177.100 Root ww: beheer taak: radius server met edir support Geïnstalleerd volgens dit installatieverslag. Hostname: opensuse.shift.local IP-adres: 192.168.177.31 Root ww: beheer taak: linux client voor authenticatie over radius Geïnstalleerd volgens dit installatieverslag.

Waarom EAP-TLS

EAP-TLS, defined in RFC 2716, is an IETF open standard, and is well-supported among wireless vendors. It offers a good deal of security, since TLS is considered the successor of the SSL standard. It uses PKI to secure communication to the RADIUS authentication server which provides excellent security however the overhead of client-side certificates can make it seem daunting to set up. Supported by many vendors including microsoft

Netware server configureren met radius support

eDirectory schema uitbreiden met radius attributen

iManager Plugins: Select Novell Radius Plugin (2.5.20050406) and NMAS plugin for eDirectory (2.5.0.20050224) Herstart iManager (tc4stop, ap2webdn, ap2webup, tomcat4) iManager → Radius → Extend Schema → Bevestigen

Export the root certificate

iManager → eDirectory Administration → Modify object → “selecteer het CA object” Ga naar het “Self Signed Certificate” tabblad en kies vervolgens voor export Exporteer de private key NIET mee met het certificaat Exporteer het certificaat in Base64 formaat Sla het bestand op als rootcert.b64.

Export the server certificate

ConsoleOne → selecteer het SSL IP server certificaat → public key certificate Exporteer inclusief private key met als wachtwoord “beheer” Sla het bestand op als servercert.pfx

Convert the certificates to PEM format

C:\OpenSSL\bin>openssl base64 -d -in rootcert.b64 | openssl x509 -inform der > rootcert.pem C:\OpenSSL\bin>openssl pkcs12 -in servercert.pfx -out servercert.pem -nodes En geef als wachtwoord “beheer” op. Je behoort de volgende melding te krijgen: MAC verified OK

Random DH file genereren

openssl dhparam -check -text -5 512 -out dh

Configureer Universal Password voor password retrieval

iManager → Passwords → Password Policies → New

LDAP server instellen

ConsoleOne → LDAP server object → SSL/TLS configuration → Server Certificate Selecteer het SSL CertificateIP Vink “Require TLS for all operations” aan. Bevestig alles.

Maak een radius admin

radius.n-team: r@diusadmin Geef de volgende rechten op de users.n-team container: ACL attribute: Compare,Read,Write All attributes: Compare,Read Entry rights: Browse Allemaal Inherited

Enable een gebruiker voor freeradius

gebruiker.users.n-team: wachtwoord iManager → radius → create radius user → “selecteer gebruiker” → bevestig iManager → radius → modify radius user → “selecteer gebruiker” → bevestig Selecteer het “check items” tab → Dial UP access → TRUE Controleer of DialupAccess en het UniqueID zijn ingevuld :

Configureer Intruder Lockout

ConsoleOne → USERS container → properties → general → intruder detection:

Radius server config

eap.conf

#
#  Whatever you do, do NOT set 'Auth-Type := EAP'.  The server
#  is smart enough to figure this out on its own.  The most
#  common side effect of setting 'Auth-Type := EAP' is that the
#  users then cannot use ANY other authentication method.
#
#	$Id: eap.conf,v 1.4 2004/04/15 18:34:41 aland Exp $
#
	eap {
		#  Invoke the default supported EAP type when
		#  EAP-Identity response is received.
		#
		#  The incoming EAP messages DO NOT specify which EAP
		#  type they will be using, so it MUST be set here.
		#
		#  For now, only one default EAP type may be used at a time.
		#
		#  If the EAP-Type attribute is set by another module,
		#  then that EAP type takes precedence over the
		#  default type configured here.
		#
		#default_eap_type = md5
		default_eap_type = peap		

		#  A list is maintained to correlate EAP-Response
		#  packets with EAP-Request packets.  After a
		#  configurable length of time, entries in the list
		#  expire, and are deleted.
		#
		timer_expire     = 60

		#  There are many EAP types, but the server has support
		#  for only a limited subset.  If the server receives
		#  a request for an EAP type it does not support, then
		#  it normally rejects the request.  By setting this
		#  configuration to "yes", you can tell the server to
		#  instead keep processing the request.  Another module
		#  MUST then be configured to proxy the request to
		#  another RADIUS server which supports that EAP type.
		#
		#  If another module is NOT configured to handle the
		#  request, then the request will still end up being
		#  rejected.
		ignore_unknown_eap_types = no

		# Cisco AP1230B firmware 12.2(13)JA1 has a bug.  When given
		# a User-Name attribute in an Access-Accept, it copies one
		# more byte than it should.
		#
		# We can work around it by configurably adding an extra
		# zero byte.
		cisco_accounting_username_bug = no

		# Supported EAP-types

		#
		#  We do NOT recommend using EAP-MD5 authentication
		#  for wireless connections.  It is insecure, and does
		#  not provide for dynamic WEP keys.
		#
		md5 {
		}

		# Cisco LEAP
		#
		#  We do not recommend using LEAP in new deployments.  See:
		#  http://www.securiteam.com/tools/5TP012ACKE.html
		#
		#  Cisco LEAP uses the MS-CHAP algorithm (but not
		#  the MS-CHAP attributes) to perform it's authentication.
		#
		#  As a result, LEAP *requires* access to the plain-text
		#  User-Password, or the NT-Password attributes.
		#  'System' authentication is impossible with LEAP.
		#
		leap {
		}

		#  Generic Token Card.
		#  
		#  Currently, this is only permitted inside of EAP-TTLS,
		#  or EAP-PEAP.  The module "challenges" the user with
		#  text, and the response from the user is taken to be
		#  the User-Password.
		#
		#  Proxying the tunneled EAP-GTC session is a bad idea,
		#  the users password will go over the wire in plain-text,
		#  for anyone to see.
		#
		gtc {
			#  The default challenge, which many clients
			#  ignore..
			#challenge = "Password: "

			#  The plain-text response which comes back
			#  is put into a User-Password attribute,
			#  and passed to another module for
			#  authentication.  This allows the EAP-GTC
			#  response to be checked against plain-text,
			#  or crypt'd passwords.
			#
			#  If you say "Local" instead of "PAP", then
			#  the module will look for a User-Password
			#  configured for the request, and do the
			#  authentication itself.
			#
			auth_type = PAP
		}

		## EAP-TLS
		#
		#  To generate ctest certificates, run the script
		#
		#	../scripts/certs.sh
		#
		#  The documents on http://www.freeradius.org/doc
		#  are old, but may be helpful.
		#
		#  See also:
		#
		#  http://www.dslreports.com/forum/remark,9286052~mode=flat
		#
		tls {
			private_key_password = beheer
			private_key_file = /etc/ssl/company/servercert.pem

			#  If Private key & Certificate are located in
			#  the same file, then private_key_file &
			#  certificate_file must contain the same file
			#  name.
			certificate_file = /etc/ssl/company/servercert.pem

			#  Trusted Root CA list
			CA_file = /etc/ssl/company/rootcert.pem

			dh_file = /etc/ssl/company/dh
			random_file = /etc/ssl/company/random

			#
			#  This can never exceed the size of a RADIUS
			#  packet (4096 bytes), and is preferably half
			#  that, to accomodate other attributes in
			#  RADIUS packet.  On most APs the MAX packet
			#  length is configured between 1500 - 1600
			#  In these cases, fragment size should be
			#  1024 or less.
			#
		#	fragment_size = 1024

			#  include_length is a flag which is
			#  by default set to yes If set to
			#  yes, Total Length of the message is
			#  included in EVERY packet we send.
			#  If set to no, Total Length of the
			#  message is included ONLY in the
			#  First packet of a fragment series.
			#
		#	include_length = yes

			#  Check the Certificate Revocation List
			#  
			#  1) Copy CA certificates and CRLs to same directory.
			#  2) Execute 'c_rehash <CA certs&CRLs Directory>'.
			#    'c_rehash' is OpenSSL's command.
			#  3) Add 'CA_path=<CA certs&CRLs directory>'
			#      to radiusd.conf's tls section.
			#  4) uncomment the line below.
			#  5) Restart radiusd
		#	check_crl = yes

                       #
                       #  If check_cert_cn is set, the value will
                       #  be xlat'ed and checked against the CN
                       #  in the client certificate.  If the values
                       #  do not match, the certificate verification
                       #  will fail rejecting the user.
                       #
               #       check_cert_cn = %{User-Name}
		}

		#  The TTLS module implements the EAP-TTLS protocol,
		#  which can be described as EAP inside of Diameter,
		#  inside of TLS, inside of EAP, inside of RADIUS...
		#
		#  Surprisingly, it works quite well.
		#
		#  The TTLS module needs the TLS module to be installed
		#  and configured, in order to use the TLS tunnel
		#  inside of the EAP packet.  You will still need to 
		#  configure the TLS module, even if you do not want
		#  to deploy EAP-TLS in your network.  Users will not
		#  be able to request EAP-TLS, as it requires them to
		#  have a client certificate.  EAP-TTLS does not
		#  require a client certificate.
		#
		#ttls {
			#  The tunneled EAP session needs a default
			#  EAP type which is separate from the one for
			#  the non-tunneled EAP module.  Inside of the
			#  TTLS tunnel, we recommend using EAP-MD5.
			#  If the request does not contain an EAP
			#  conversation, then this configuration entry
			#  is ignored.
		#	default_eap_type = md5

			#  The tunneled authentication request does
			#  not usually contain useful attributes
			#  like 'Calling-Station-Id', etc.  These
			#  attributes are outside of the tunnel,
			#  and normally unavailable to the tunneled
			#  authentication request.
			#
			#  By setting this configuration entry to
			#  'yes', any attribute which NOT in the
			#  tunneled authentication request, but
			#  which IS available outside of the tunnel,
			#  is copied to the tunneled request.
			#
			# allowed values: {no, yes}
		#	copy_request_to_tunnel = no

			#  The reply attributes sent to the NAS are
                        #  usually based on the name of the user
			#  'outside' of the tunnel (usually
			#  'anonymous').  If you want to send the
			#  reply attributes based on the user name
			#  inside of the tunnel, then set this
			#  configuration entry to 'yes', and the reply
			#  to the NAS will be taken from the reply to
			#  the tunneled request.
			#
			# allowed values: {no, yes}
		#	use_tunneled_reply = no			
			   
		#}

		#
		#  The tunneled EAP session needs a default EAP type
		#  which is separate from the one for the non-tunneled
		#  EAP module.  Inside of the TLS/PEAP tunnel, we
		#  recommend using EAP-MS-CHAPv2.
		#
		#  The PEAP module needs the TLS module to be installed
		#  and configured, in order to use the TLS tunnel
		#  inside of the EAP packet.  You will still need to 
		#  configure the TLS module, even if you do not want
		#  to deploy EAP-TLS in your network.  Users will not
		#  be able to request EAP-TLS, as it requires them to
		#  have a client certificate.  EAP-PEAP does not
		#  require a client certificate.
		#
		 peap {
			#  The tunneled EAP session needs a default
			#  EAP type which is separate from the one for
			#  the non-tunneled EAP module.  Inside of the
			#  PEAP tunnel, we recommend using MS-CHAPv2,
			#  as that is the default type supported by
			#  Windows clients.
			default_eap_type = mschapv2
		}

		#
		#  This takes no configuration.
		#

		#  Note that it is the EAP MS-CHAPv2 sub-module, not
		#  the main 'mschap' module.
		#
		#  Note also that in order for this sub-module to work,
		#  the main 'mschap' module MUST ALSO be configured.
		#
		#  This module is the *Microsoft* implementation of MS-CHAPv2
		#  in EAP.  There is another (incompatible) implementation
		#  of MS-CHAPv2 in EAP by Cisco, which FreeRADIUS does not
		#  currently support.
		#
		mschapv2 {
		}
	}

clients.conf

#
# clients.conf - client configuration directives
#
#######################################################################

client 127.0.0.1 {
	secret		= testing123

	shortname	= localhost
	
	nastype     = other	# localhost isn't usually a NAS...
#	login       = !root
#	password    = someadminpas
}


#
# Linux client
#

client 192.168.177.128 {
	secret		= testing1234

	shortname	= client
	
	nastype     = other	# localhost isn't usually a NAS...
#	login       = !root
#	password    = someadminpas
}

radiusd.conf

##
## radiusd.conf	-- FreeRADIUS server configuration file.
##
##	http://www.freeradius.org/
##	$Id: radiusd.conf.in,v 1.188.2.4.2.18 2007/07/16 10:53:13 pnixon Exp $
##

#  	The location of other config files and
#  	logfiles are declared in this file
#
#  	Also general configuration for modules can be done
#  	in this file, it is exported through the API to
#  	modules that ask for it.
#
#	The configuration variables defined here are of the form ${foo}
#	They are local to this file, and do not change from request to
#	request.
#
#	The per-request variables are of the form %{Attribute-Name}, and
#	are taken from the values of the attribute in the incoming
#	request.  See 'doc/variables.txt' for more information.

prefix = /
exec_prefix = ${prefix}
sysconfdir = ${prefix}/etc
localstatedir = ${prefix}/var
sbindir = ${exec_prefix}/sbin
logdir = ${localstatedir}/log/radius
raddbdir = ${sysconfdir}/raddb
radacctdir = ${logdir}/radacct

#  Location of config and logfiles.
confdir = ${raddbdir}
run_dir = ${localstatedir}/run/radiusd

#
#  The logging messages for the server are appended to the
#  tail of this file.
#
log_file = ${logdir}/radius.log

#
# libdir: Where to find the rlm_* modules.
#
#   This should be automatically set at configuration time.
#
#   If the server builds and installs, but fails at execution time
#   with an 'undefined symbol' error, then you can use the libdir
#   directive to work around the problem.
#
#   The cause is usually that a library has been installed on your
#   system in a place where the dynamic linker CANNOT find it.  When
#   executing as root (or another user), your personal environment MAY
#   be set up to allow the dynamic linker to find the library.  When
#   executing as a daemon, FreeRADIUS MAY NOT have the same
#   personalized configuration.
#
#   To work around the problem, find out which library contains that symbol,
#   and add the directory containing that library to the end of 'libdir',
#   with a colon separating the directory names.  NO spaces are allowed.
#
#   e.g. libdir = /usr/local/lib:/opt/package/lib
#
#   You can also try setting the LD_LIBRARY_PATH environment variable
#   in a script which starts the server.
#
#   If that does not work, then you can re-configure and re-build the
#   server to NOT use shared libraries, via:
#
#	./configure --disable-shared
#	make
#	make install
#
libdir = ${exec_prefix}/lib

#  pidfile: Where to place the PID of the RADIUS server.
#
#  The server may be signalled while it's running by using this
#  file.
#
#  This file is written when ONLY running in daemon mode.
#
#  e.g.:  kill -HUP `cat /var/run/radiusd/radiusd.pid`
#
pidfile = ${run_dir}/radiusd.pid


# user/group: The name (or #number) of the user/group to run radiusd as.
#
#   If these are commented out, the server will run as the user/group
#   that started it.  In order to change to a different user/group, you
#   MUST be root ( or have root privleges ) to start the server.
#
#   We STRONGLY recommend that you run the server with as few permissions
#   as possible.  That is, if you're not using shadow passwords, the
#   user and group items below should be set to 'nobody'.
#
#    On SCO (ODT 3) use "user = nouser" and "group = nogroup".
#
#  NOTE that some kernels refuse to setgid(group) when the value of
#  (unsigned)group is above 60000; don't use group nobody on these systems!
#
#  On systems with shadow passwords, you might have to set 'group = shadow'
#  for the server to be able to read the shadow password file.  If you can
#  authenticate users while in debug mode, but not in daemon mode, it may be
#  that the debugging mode server is running as a user that can read the
#  shadow info, and the user listed below can not.
#
#user = nobody
#group = nobody

#  max_request_time: The maximum time (in seconds) to handle a request.
#
#  Requests which take more time than this to process may be killed, and
#  a REJECT message is returned.
#
#  WARNING: If you notice that requests take a long time to be handled,
#  then this MAY INDICATE a bug in the server, in one of the modules
#  used to handle a request, OR in your local configuration.
#
#  This problem is most often seen when using an SQL database.  If it takes
#  more than a second or two to receive an answer from the SQL database,
#  then it probably means that you haven't indexed the database.  See your
#  SQL server documentation for more information.
#
#  Useful range of values: 5 to 120
#
max_request_time = 30

#  delete_blocked_requests: If the request takes MORE THAN 'max_request_time'
#  to be handled, then maybe the server should delete it.
#
#  If you're running in threaded, or thread pool mode, this setting
#  should probably be 'no'.  Setting it to 'yes' when using a threaded
#  server MAY cause the server to crash!
#
delete_blocked_requests = no

#  cleanup_delay: The time to wait (in seconds) before cleaning up
#  a reply which was sent to the NAS.
#
#  The RADIUS request is normally cached internally for a short period
#  of time, after the reply is sent to the NAS.  The reply packet may be
#  lost in the network, and the NAS will not see it.  The NAS will then
#  re-send the request, and the server will respond quickly with the
#  cached reply.
#
#  If this value is set too low, then duplicate requests from the NAS
#  MAY NOT be detected, and will instead be handled as seperate requests.
#
#  If this value is set too high, then the server will cache too many
#  requests, and some new requests may get blocked.  (See 'max_requests'.)
#
#  Useful range of values: 2 to 10
#
cleanup_delay = 5

#  max_requests: The maximum number of requests which the server keeps
#  track of.  This should be 256 multiplied by the number of clients.
#  e.g. With 4 clients, this number should be 1024.
#
#  If this number is too low, then when the server becomes busy,
#  it will not respond to any new requests, until the 'cleanup_delay'
#  time has passed, and it has removed the old requests.
#
#  If this number is set too high, then the server will use a bit more
#  memory for no real benefit.
#
#  If you aren't sure what it should be set to, it's better to set it
#  too high than too low.  Setting it to 1000 per client is probably
#  the highest it should be.
#
#  Useful range of values: 256 to infinity
#
max_requests = 1024

#  bind_address:  Make the server listen on a particular IP address, and
#  send replies out from that address.  This directive is most useful
#  for machines with multiple IP addresses on one interface.
#
#  It can either contain "*", or an IP address, or a fully qualified
#  Internet domain name.  The default is "*"
#
#  As of 1.0, you can also use the "listen" directive.  See below for
#  more information.
#
bind_address = *

#  port: Allows you to bind FreeRADIUS to a specific port.
#
#  The default port that most NAS boxes use is 1645, which is historical.
#  RFC 2138 defines 1812 to be the new port.  Many new servers and
#  NAS boxes use 1812, which can create interoperability problems.
#
#  The port is defined here to be 0 so that the server will pick up
#  the machine's local configuration for the radius port, as defined
#  in /etc/services.
#
#  If you want to use the default RADIUS port as defined on your server,
#  (usually through 'grep radius /etc/services') set this to 0 (zero).
#
#  A port given on the command-line via '-p' over-rides this one.
#
#  As of 1.0, you can also use the "listen" directive.  See below for
#  more information.
#
port = 0

#
#  By default, the server uses "bind_address" to listen to all IP's
#  on a machine, or just one IP.  The "port" configuration is used
#  to select the authentication port used when listening on those
#  addresses.
#
#  If you want the server to listen on additional addresses, you can
#  use the "listen" section.  A sample section (commented out) is included
#  below.  This "listen" section duplicates the functionality of the
#  "bind_address" and "port" configuration entries, but it only listens
#  for authentication packets.
#
#  If you comment out the "bind_address" and "port" configuration entries,
#  then it becomes possible to make the server accept only accounting,
#  or authentication packets.  Previously, it always listened for both
#  types of packets, and it was impossible to make it listen for only
#  one type of packet.
#
#listen {
	#  IP address on which to listen.
	#  Allowed values are:
	#	dotted quad (1.2.3.4)
	#       hostname    (radius.example.com)
	#       wildcard    (*)
#	ipaddr = *

	#  Port on which to listen.
	#  Allowed values are:
	#	integer port number (1812)
	#	0 means "use /etc/services for the proper port"
#	port = 0

	#  Type of packets to listen for.
	#  Allowed values are:
	#	auth	listen for authentication packets
	#	acct	listen for accounting packets
	#
#	type = auth
#}


#  hostname_lookups: Log the names of clients or just their IP addresses
#  e.g., www.freeradius.org (on) or 206.47.27.232 (off).
#
#  The default is 'off' because it would be overall better for the net
#  if people had to knowingly turn this feature on, since enabling it
#  means that each client request will result in AT LEAST one lookup
#  request to the nameserver.   Enabling hostname_lookups will also
#  mean that your server may stop randomly for 30 seconds from time
#  to time, if the DNS requests take too long.
#
#  Turning hostname lookups off also means that the server won't block
#  for 30 seconds, if it sees an IP address which has no name associated
#  with it.
#
#  allowed values: {no, yes}
#
hostname_lookups = no

#  Core dumps are a bad thing.  This should only be set to 'yes'
#  if you're debugging a problem with the server.
#
#  allowed values: {no, yes}
#
allow_core_dumps = no

#  Regular expressions
#
#  These items are set at configure time.  If they're set to "yes",
#  then setting them to "no" turns off regular expression support.
#
#  If they're set to "no" at configure time, then setting them to "yes"
#  WILL NOT WORK.  It will give you an error.
#
regular_expressions	= yes
extended_expressions	= yes

#  Log the full User-Name attribute, as it was found in the request.
#
# allowed values: {no, yes}
#
log_stripped_names = no

#  Log authentication requests to the log file.
#
#  allowed values: {no, yes}
#
log_auth = no

#  Log passwords with the authentication requests.
#  log_auth_badpass  - logs password if it's rejected
#  log_auth_goodpass - logs password if it's correct
#
#  allowed values: {no, yes}
#
log_auth_badpass = no
log_auth_goodpass = no

# usercollide:  Turn "username collision" code on and off.  See the
# "doc/duplicate-users" file
#
#  WARNING
#  !!!!!!!  Setting this to "yes" may result in the server behaving
#  !!!!!!!  strangely.  The "username collision" code will ONLY work
#  !!!!!!!  with clear-text passwords.  Even then, it may not do what
#  !!!!!!!  you want, or what you expect.
#  !!!!!!!
#  !!!!!!!  We STRONGLY RECOMMEND that you do not use this feature,
#  !!!!!!!  and that you find another way of acheiving the same goal.
#  !!!!!!!
#  !!!!!!!  e,g. module fail-over.  See 'doc/configurable_failover'
#  WARNING
#
usercollide = no

# lower_user / lower_pass:  
# Lower case the username/password "before" or "after"
# attempting to authenticate.  
#
#  If "before", the server will first modify the request and then try
#  to auth the user.  If "after", the server will first auth using the
#  values provided by the user.  If that fails it will reprocess the
#  request after modifying it as you specify below.
#
#  This is as close as we can get to case insensitivity.  It is the
#  admin's job to ensure that the username on the auth db side is
#  *also* lowercase to make this work
#
# Default is 'no' (don't lowercase values)
# Valid values = "before" / "after" / "no"
#
lower_user = no
lower_pass = no

# nospace_user / nospace_pass:
#
#  Some users like to enter spaces in their username or password
#  incorrectly.  To save yourself the tech support call, you can
#  eliminate those spaces here:
#
# Default is 'no' (don't remove spaces)
# Valid values = "before" / "after" / "no" (explanation above)
#
nospace_user = no
nospace_pass = no

#  The program to execute to do concurrency checks.
checkrad = ${sbindir}/checkrad

# SECURITY CONFIGURATION
#
#  There may be multiple methods of attacking on the server.  This
#  section holds the configuration items which minimize the impact
#  of those attacks
#
security {
	#
	#  max_attributes: The maximum number of attributes
	#  permitted in a RADIUS packet.  Packets which have MORE
	#  than this number of attributes in them will be dropped.
	#
	#  If this number is set too low, then no RADIUS packets
	#  will be accepted.
	#
	#  If this number is set too high, then an attacker may be
	#  able to send a small number of packets which will cause
	#  the server to use all available memory on the machine.
	#
	#  Setting this number to 0 means "allow any number of attributes"
	max_attributes = 200

	#
	#  reject_delay: When sending an Access-Reject, it can be
	#  delayed for a few seconds.  This may help slow down a DoS
	#  attack.  It also helps to slow down people trying to brute-force
	#  crack a users password.
	#
	#  Setting this number to 0 means "send rejects immediately"
	#
	#  If this number is set higher than 'cleanup_delay', then the
	#  rejects will be sent at 'cleanup_delay' time, when the request
	#  is deleted from the internal cache of requests.
	#
	#  Useful ranges: 1 to 5
	reject_delay = 1

	#
	#  status_server: Whether or not the server will respond
	#  to Status-Server requests.
	#
	#  Normally this should be set to "no", because they're useless.
	#  See: http://www.freeradius.org/rfc/rfc2865.html#Keep-Alives
	#
	#  However, certain NAS boxes may require them.	
	#
	#  When sent a Status-Server message, the server responds with
	#  an Access-Accept packet, containing a Reply-Message attribute,
	#  which is a string describing how long the server has been
	#  running.
	#
	status_server = no
}

# PROXY CONFIGURATION
#
#  proxy_requests: Turns proxying of RADIUS requests on or off.
#
#  The server has proxying turned on by default.  If your system is NOT
#  set up to proxy requests to another server, then you can turn proxying
#  off here.  This will save a small amount of resources on the server.
#
#  If you have proxying turned off, and your configuration files say
#  to proxy a request, then an error message will be logged.
#
#  To disable proxying, change the "yes" to "no", and comment the
#  $INCLUDE line.
#
#  allowed values: {no, yes}
#
proxy_requests  = yes
$INCLUDE  ${confdir}/proxy.conf


# CLIENTS CONFIGURATION
#
#  Client configuration is defined in "clients.conf".  
#

#  The 'clients.conf' file contains all of the information from the old
#  'clients' and 'naslist' configuration files.  We recommend that you
#  do NOT use 'client's or 'naslist', although they are still
#  supported.
#
#  Anything listed in 'clients.conf' will take precedence over the
#  information from the old-style configuration files.
#
$INCLUDE  ${confdir}/clients.conf


# SNMP CONFIGURATION
#
#  Snmp configuration is only valid if SNMP support was enabled
#  at compile time.
#
#  To enable SNMP querying of the server, set the value of the
#  'snmp' attribute to 'yes'
#
snmp	= no
$INCLUDE  ${confdir}/snmp.conf


# THREAD POOL CONFIGURATION
#
#  The thread pool is a long-lived group of threads which
#  take turns (round-robin) handling any incoming requests.
#
#  You probably want to have a few spare threads around,
#  so that high-load situations can be handled immediately.  If you
#  don't have any spare threads, then the request handling will
#  be delayed while a new thread is created, and added to the pool.
#
#  You probably don't want too many spare threads around,
#  otherwise they'll be sitting there taking up resources, and
#  not doing anything productive.
#
#  The numbers given below should be adequate for most situations.
#
thread pool {
	#  Number of servers to start initially --- should be a reasonable
	#  ballpark figure.
	start_servers = 5

	#  Limit on the total number of servers running.
	#
	#  If this limit is ever reached, clients will be LOCKED OUT, so it
	#  should NOT BE SET TOO LOW.  It is intended mainly as a brake to
	#  keep a runaway server from taking the system with it as it spirals
	#  down...
	#
	#  You may find that the server is regularly reaching the
	#  'max_servers' number of threads, and that increasing
	#  'max_servers' doesn't seem to make much difference.
	#
	#  If this is the case, then the problem is MOST LIKELY that
	#  your back-end databases are taking too long to respond, and
	#  are preventing the server from responding in a timely manner.
	#
	#  The solution is NOT do keep increasing the 'max_servers'
	#  value, but instead to fix the underlying cause of the
	#  problem: slow database, or 'hostname_lookups=yes'.
	#
	#  For more information, see 'max_request_time', above.
	#
	max_servers = 32

	#  Server-pool size regulation.  Rather than making you guess
	#  how many servers you need, FreeRADIUS dynamically adapts to
	#  the load it sees, that is, it tries to maintain enough
	#  servers to handle the current load, plus a few spare
	#  servers to handle transient load spikes.
	#
	#  It does this by periodically checking how many servers are
	#  waiting for a request.  If there are fewer than
	#  min_spare_servers, it creates a new spare.  If there are
	#  more than max_spare_servers, some of the spares die off.
	#  The default values are probably OK for most sites.
	#
	min_spare_servers = 3
	max_spare_servers = 10

	#  There may be memory leaks or resource allocation problems with
	#  the server.  If so, set this value to 300 or so, so that the
	#  resources will be cleaned up periodically.
	#
	#  This should only be necessary if there are serious bugs in the
	#  server which have not yet been fixed.
	#
	#  '0' is a special value meaning 'infinity', or 'the servers never
	#  exit'
	max_requests_per_server = 0
}

# MODULE CONFIGURATION
#
#  The names and configuration of each module is located in this section.
#
#  After the modules are defined here, they may be referred to by name,
#  in other sections of this configuration file.
#
modules {
	#
	#  Each module has a configuration as follows:
	#
	#	name [ instance ] {
	#		config_item = value
	#		...
	#	}
	#
	#  The 'name' is used to load the 'rlm_name' library
	#  which implements the functionality of the module.
	#
	#  The 'instance' is optional.  To have two different instances
	#  of a module, it first must be referred to by 'name'.
	#  The different copies of the module are then created by
	#  inventing two 'instance' names, e.g. 'instance1' and 'instance2'
	#
	#  The instance names can then be used in later configuration
	#  INSTEAD of the original 'name'.  See the 'radutmp' configuration
	#  below for an example.
	#

	# PAP module to authenticate users based on their stored password
	#
	#  As of 1.1.4, the "encryption_scheme" configuration should
	#  no longer be used.  For backwards compatibility, it will still
	#  work as before, but we recommend that it is not used.
	# 
	#  The replacement is "auto_header = yes".
	#  For backwards compatibility, the default is "auto_header = no",
	#  but we recommend reviewing your use of the PAP module, based
	#  on the documentation in "man rlm_pap".
	#
	#  The new capability in this module makes it MUCH easier to
	#  configure the server for multiple crypt/hash schemes, AND
	#  it supports more methods than before.  Please read "man rlm_pap"
	#  for more detailed documentation.
 	#
	pap {
		auto_header = yes
	}

	# CHAP module
	#
	#  To authenticate requests containing a CHAP-Password attribute.
	#
	chap {
		authtype = CHAP
	}

	# Pluggable Authentication Modules
	#
	#  For Linux, see:
	#	http://www.kernel.org/pub/linux/libs/pam/index.html
	#
	#  WARNING: On many systems, the system PAM libraries have
	#           memory leaks!  We STRONGLY SUGGEST that you do not
	#	    use PAM for authentication, due to those memory leaks.
	#
	pam {
		#
		#  The name to use for PAM authentication.
		#  PAM looks in /etc/pam.d/${pam_auth_name}
		#  for it's configuration.  See 'redhat/radiusd-pam'
		#  for a sample PAM configuration file.
		#
		#  Note that any Pam-Auth attribute set in the 'authorize'
		#  section will over-ride this one.
		#
		pam_auth = radiusd
	}

	# Unix /etc/passwd style authentication
	#
	unix {
		#
		#  Cache /etc/passwd, /etc/shadow, and /etc/group
		#
		#  The default is to NOT cache them.
		#
		#  For FreeBSD and NetBSD, you do NOT want to enable
		#  the cache, as it's password lookups are done via a
		#  database, so set this value to 'no'.
		#
		#  Some systems (e.g. RedHat Linux with pam_pwbd) can
		#  take *seconds* to check a password, when th passwd
		#  file containing 1000's of entries.  For those systems,
		#  you should set the cache value to 'yes', and set
		#  the locations of the 'passwd', 'shadow', and 'group'
		#  files, below.
		#
		# allowed values: {no, yes}
		cache = no

		# Reload the cache every 600 seconds (10mins). 0 to disable.
		cache_reload = 600

		#
		#  Define the locations of the normal passwd, shadow, and
		#  group files.
		#
		#  'shadow' is commented out by default, because not all
		#  systems have shadow passwords.
		#
		#  To force the module to use the system password functions,
		#  instead of reading the files, leave the following entries
		#  commented out.
		#
		#  This is required for some systems, like FreeBSD,
		#  and Mac OSX.
		#
		#	passwd = /etc/passwd
		#	shadow = /etc/shadow
		#	group = /etc/group

		#
		#  The location of the "wtmp" file.
		#  This should be moved to it's own module soon.
		#
		#  The only use for 'radlast'.  If you don't use
		#  'radlast', then you can comment out this item.
		#
		radwtmp = ${logdir}/radwtmp
	}

	#  Extensible Authentication Protocol
	#
	#  For all EAP related authentications.
	#  Now in another file, because it is very large.
	#
$INCLUDE ${confdir}/eap.conf

	# Microsoft CHAP authentication
	#
	#  This module supports MS-CHAP and MS-CHAPv2 authentication.
	#  It also enforces the SMB-Account-Ctrl attribute.
	#
	mschap {
		#
		#  As of 0.9, the mschap module does NOT support
		#  reading from /etc/smbpasswd.
		#
		#  If you are using /etc/smbpasswd, see the 'passwd'
		#  module for an example of how to use /etc/smbpasswd

		# authtype value, if present, will be used
		# to overwrite (or add) Auth-Type during
		# authorization. Normally should be MS-CHAP
		authtype = MS-CHAP
		
		# if use_mppe is not set to no mschap will
		# add MS-CHAP-MPPE-Keys for MS-CHAPv1 and
		# MS-MPPE-Recv-Key/MS-MPPE-Send-Key for MS-CHAPv2
		#
		use_mppe = yes

		# if mppe is enabled require_encryption makes
		# encryption moderate
		#
		require_encryption = yes

		# require_strong always requires 128 bit key
		# encryption
		#
		require_strong = yes

		# Windows sends us a username in the form of
		# DOMAIN\user, but sends the challenge response
		# based on only the user portion.  This hack
		# corrects for that incorrect behavior.
		#
		#with_ntdomain_hack = no

		# The module can perform authentication itself, OR
		# use a Windows Domain Controller.  This configuration
		# directive tells the module to call the ntlm_auth
		# program, which will do the authentication, and return
		# the NT-Key.  Note that you MUST have "winbindd" and
		# "nmbd" running on the local machine for ntlm_auth
		# to work.  See the ntlm_auth program documentation
		# for details.
		#
		# Be VERY careful when editing the following line!
		#
		#ntlm_auth = "/path/to/ntlm_auth --request-nt-key --username=%{Stripped-User-Name:-%{User-Name:-None}} --challenge=%{mschap:Challenge:-00} --nt-response=%{mschap:NT-Response:-00}"
	}

	# Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP)
	#
	#  This module definition allows you to use LDAP for
	#  authorization and authentication.
	#
	#  See doc/rlm_ldap for description of configuration options 
	#  and sample authorize{} and authenticate{} blocks 
	#
	#  However, LDAP can be used for authentication ONLY when the
	#  Access-Request packet contains a clear-text User-Password
	#  attribute.  LDAP authentication will NOT work for any other
	#  authentication method.
	#
	#  This means that LDAP servers don't understand EAP.  If you
	#  force "Auth-Type = LDAP", and then send the server a
	#  request containing EAP authentication, then authentication
	#  WILL NOT WORK.
	#
	#  The solution is to use the default configuration, which does
	#  work.
	#
	#  Setting "Auth-Type = LDAP" is ALMOST ALWAYS WRONG.  We
	#  really can't emphasize this enough.
	#	
	ldap company1 {
		server = "192.168.177.10"
		identity = "cn=radius,o=n-team"
		password = "r@diusadmin"
		basedn = "ou=users,o=n-team"
		filter = "(cn=%{Stripped-User-Name:-%{User-Name}})"
		base_filter = "(objectclass=radiusprofile)"

		# set this to 'yes' to use TLS encrypted connections
		# to the LDAP database by using the StartTLS extended
		# operation.
		# The StartTLS operation is supposed to be used with normal
		# ldap connections instead of using ldaps (port 689) connections
		start_tls = yes

		tls_cacertfile	= /etc/ssl/company/rootcert.b64
		# tls_cacertdir		= /path/to/ca/dir/
		# tls_certfile		= /path/to/radius.crt
		# tls_keyfile		= /path/to/radius.key
		# tls_randfile		= /path/to/rnd
		tls_require_cert	= "demand"

		# default_profile = "cn=radprofile,ou=dialup,o=My Org,c=UA"
		# profile_attribute = "radiusProfileDn"
		access_attr = "dialupAccess"

		# Mapping of RADIUS dictionary attributes to LDAP
		# directory attributes.
		dictionary_mapping = ${raddbdir}/ldap.attrmap

		ldap_connections_number = 5

		#
		# NOTICE: The password_header directive is NOT case insensitive
		#
		# password_header = "{clear}"
		#
		# Set:
		#	password_attribute = nspmPassword
		#
		# to get the user's password from a Novell eDirectory
		# backend. This will work *only if* freeRADIUS is
		# configured to build with --with-edir option.
		#
		#
		#  The server can usually figure this out on its own, and pull
		#  the correct User-Password or NT-Password from the database.
		#
		#  Note that NT-Passwords MUST be stored as a 32-digit hex
		#  string, and MUST start off with "0x", such as:
		#
		#	0x000102030405060708090a0b0c0d0e0f
		#
		#  Without the leading "0x", NT-Passwords will not work.
		#  This goes for NT-Passwords stored in SQL, too.
		#
		password_attribute = nspmPassword
		#
		# Un-comment the following to disable Novell eDirectory account
		# policy check and intruder detection. This will work *only if*
		# FreeRADIUS is configured to build with --with-edir option.
		#
		edir_account_policy_check=yes
		#
		# groupname_attribute = cn
		# groupmembership_filter = "(|(&(objectClass=GroupOfNames)(member=%{Ldap-UserDn}))(&(objectClass=GroupOfUniqueNames)(uniquemember=%{Ldap-UserDn})))"
		# groupmembership_attribute = radiusGroupName
		timeout = 4
		timelimit = 3
		net_timeout = 1
		# compare_check_items = yes
		# do_xlat = yes
		# access_attr_used_for_allow = yes
	}


		#
		#  By default, if the packet contains a User-Password,
		#  and no other module is configured to handle the
		#  authentication, the LDAP module sets itself to do
		#  LDAP bind for authentication.
		#
		#  You can disable this behavior by setting the following
		#  configuration entry to "no".
		#
		#  allowed values: {no, yes}
		# set_auth_type = yes

	# passwd module allows to do authorization via any passwd-like
	# file and to extract any attributes from these modules
	#
	# parameters are:
	#   filename - path to filename
	#   format - format for filename record. This parameters
	#            correlates record in the passwd file and RADIUS
	#            attributes.
	#
	#            Field marked as '*' is key field. That is, the parameter
	#            with this name from the request is used to search for
	#            the record from passwd file
	#            Attribute marked as '=' is added to reply_itmes instead
	#            of default configure_itmes
	#	     Attribute marked as '~' is added to request_items
	#
	#            Field marked as ',' may contain a comma separated list
	#            of attributes.
	#   authtype - if record found this Auth-Type is used to authenticate
	#            user
	#   hashsize - hashtable size. If 0 or not specified records are not
	#            stored in memory and file is red on every request.
	#   allowmultiplekeys - if few records for every key are allowed
	#   ignorenislike - ignore NIS-related records
	#   delimiter - symbol to use as a field separator in passwd file,
	#            for format ':' symbol is always used. '\0', '\n' are
        #	     not allowed 
	#

	#  An example configuration for using /etc/smbpasswd.
	#
	#passwd etc_smbpasswd {
	#	filename = /etc/smbpasswd
	#	format = "*User-Name::LM-Password:NT-Password:SMB-Account-CTRL-TEXT::"
	#	authtype = MS-CHAP
	#	hashsize = 100
	#	ignorenislike = no
	#	allowmultiplekeys = no
	#}

	#  Similar configuration, for the /etc/group file. Adds a Group-Name
	#  attribute for every group that the user is member of.
	#
	#passwd etc_group {
	#	filename = /etc/group
	#	format = "=Group-Name:::*,User-Name"
	#	hashsize = 50
	#	ignorenislike = yes
	#	allowmultiplekeys = yes
	#	delimiter = ":"
	#}

	# Realm module, for proxying.
	#
	#  You can have multiple instances of the realm module to
	#  support multiple realm syntaxs at the same time.  The
	#  search order is defined by the order in the authorize and
	#  preacct sections.
	#
	#  Four config options:
	#	format         -  must be 'prefix' or 'suffix'
	#	delimiter      -  must be a single character
	#	ignore_default -  set to 'yes' or 'no'
	#       ignore_null    -  set to 'yes' or 'no'
	#
	#  ignore_default and ignore_null can be set to 'yes' to prevent
	#  the module from matching against DEFAULT or NULL realms.  This
	#  may be useful if you have have multiple instances of the
	#  realm module.
	#
	#  They both default to 'no'.
	#

	#  'realm/username'
	#
	#  Using this entry, IPASS users have their realm set to "IPASS".
	realm IPASS {
		format = prefix
		delimiter = "/"
		ignore_default = no
		ignore_null = no
	}

	#  'username@realm'
	#
	realm suffix {
		format = suffix
		delimiter = "@"
		ignore_default = no
		ignore_null = no
	}

	#  'username%realm'
	#
	realm realmpercent {
		format = suffix
		delimiter = "%"
		ignore_default = no
		ignore_null = no
	}

	#
	#  'domain\user'
	#
	realm ntdomain {
		format = prefix
		delimiter = "\\"
		ignore_default = no
		ignore_null = no
	}	

	#  A simple value checking module
	#
	#  It can be used to check if an attribute value in the request
	#  matches a (possibly multi valued) attribute in the check
	#  items This can be used for example for caller-id
	#  authentication.  For the module to run, both the request
	#  attribute and the check items attribute must exist
	#
	#  i.e.
	#  A user has an ldap entry with 2 radiusCallingStationId
	#  attributes with values "12345678" and "12345679".  If we
	#  enable rlm_checkval, then any request which contains a
	#  Calling-Station-Id with one of those two values will be
	#  accepted.  Requests with other values for
	#  Calling-Station-Id will be rejected.
	#
	#  Regular expressions in the check attribute value are allowed
	#  as long as the operator is '=~'
	#
	checkval {
		# The attribute to look for in the request
		item-name = Calling-Station-Id

		# The attribute to look for in check items. Can be multi valued
		check-name = Calling-Station-Id

		# The data type. Can be
		# string,integer,ipaddr,date,abinary,octets
		data-type = string

		# If set to yes and we dont find the item-name attribute in the
		# request then we send back a reject
		# DEFAULT is no
		#notfound-reject = no
	}
	
	#  rewrite arbitrary packets.  Useful in accounting and authorization.
	#
	#
	#  The module can also use the Rewrite-Rule attribute. If it
	#  is set and matches the name of the module instance, then
	#  that module instance will be the only one which runs.
	#
	#  Also if new_attribute is set to yes then a new attribute
	#  will be created containing the value replacewith and it
	#  will be added to searchin (packet, reply, proxy, proxy_reply or config).
	# searchfor,ignore_case and max_matches will be ignored in that case.
	#
	# Backreferences are supported: %{0} will contain the string the whole match
	# and %{1} to %{8} will contain the contents of the 1st to the 8th parentheses
	#
	# If max_matches is greater than one the backreferences will correspond to the
	# first match

	#
	#attr_rewrite sanecallerid {
	#	attribute = Called-Station-Id
		# may be "packet", "reply", "proxy", "proxy_reply" or "config"
	#	searchin = packet
	#	searchfor = "[+ ]"
	#	replacewith = ""
	#	ignore_case = no
	#	new_attribute = no
	#	max_matches = 10
	#	## If set to yes then the replace string will be appended to the original string
	#	append = no
	#}

	# Preprocess the incoming RADIUS request, before handing it off
	# to other modules.
	#
	#  This module processes the 'huntgroups' and 'hints' files.
	#  In addition, it re-writes some weird attributes created
	#  by some NASes, and converts the attributes into a form which
	#  is a little more standard.
	#
	preprocess {
		huntgroups = ${confdir}/huntgroups
		hints = ${confdir}/hints

		# This hack changes Ascend's wierd port numberings
		# to standard 0-??? port numbers so that the "+" works
		# for IP address assignments.
		with_ascend_hack = no
		ascend_channels_per_line = 23

		# Windows NT machines often authenticate themselves as
		# NT_DOMAIN\username
		#
		# If this is set to 'yes', then the NT_DOMAIN portion
		# of the user-name is silently discarded.
		#
		# This configuration entry SHOULD NOT be used.
		# See the "realms" module for a better way to handle
		# NT domains.
		with_ntdomain_hack = no

		# Specialix Jetstream 8500 24 port access server.
		#
		# If the user name is 10 characters or longer, a "/"
		# and the excess characters after the 10th are
		# appended to the user name.
		#
		# If you're not running that NAS, you don't need
		# this hack.
		with_specialix_jetstream_hack = no

		# Cisco (and Quintum in Cisco mode) sends it's VSA attributes
		# with the attribute name *again* in the string, like:
		#
		#   H323-Attribute = "h323-attribute=value".
		#
		# If this configuration item is set to 'yes', then
		# the redundant data in the the attribute text is stripped
		# out.  The result is:
		#
		#  H323-Attribute = "value"
		#
		# If you're not running a Cisco or Quintum NAS, you don't
		# need this hack.
		with_cisco_vsa_hack = no
	}

	# Livingston-style 'users' file
	#
	files {
		usersfile = ${confdir}/users
		acctusersfile = ${confdir}/acct_users
		preproxy_usersfile = ${confdir}/preproxy_users

		#  If you want to use the old Cistron 'users' file
		#  with FreeRADIUS, you should change the next line
		#  to 'compat = cistron'.  You can the copy your 'users'
		#  file from Cistron.
		compat = no
	}

	# Write a detailed log of all accounting records received.
	#
	detail {
		#  Note that we do NOT use NAS-IP-Address here, as
		#  that attribute MAY BE from the originating NAS, and
		#  NOT from the proxy which actually sent us the
		#  request.  The Client-IP-Address attribute is ALWAYS
		#  the address of the client which sent us the
		#  request.
		#
		#  The following line creates a new detail file for
		#  every radius client (by IP address or hostname).
		#  In addition, a new detail file is created every
		#  day, so that the detail file doesn't have to go
		#  through a 'log rotation'
		#
		#  If your detail files are large, you may also want
		#  to add a ':%H' (see doc/variables.txt) to the end
		#  of it, to create a new detail file every hour, e.g.:
		#
		#   ..../detail-%Y%m%d:%H
		#
		#  This will create a new detail file for every hour.
		#
		detailfile = ${radacctdir}/%{Client-IP-Address}/detail-%Y%m%d

		#
		#  The Unix-style permissions on the 'detail' file.
		#
		#  The detail file often contains secret or private
		#  information about users.  So by keeping the file
		#  permissions restrictive, we can prevent unwanted
		#  people from seeing that information.
		detailperm = 0600

		#
		# Certain attributes such as User-Password may be
		# "sensitive", so they should not be printed in the
		# detail file.  This section lists the attributes
		# that should be suppressed.
		#
		# The attributes should be listed one to a line.
		#
		#suppress {
			# User-Password
		#}
	}

	#
	#  Many people want to log authentication requests.
	#  Rather than modifying the server core to print out more
	#  messages, we can use a different instance of the 'detail'
	#  module, to log the authentication requests to a file.
	#
	#  You will also need to un-comment the 'auth_log' line
	#  in the 'authorize' section, below.
	#
	# detail auth_log {
		# detailfile = ${radacctdir}/%{Client-IP-Address}/auth-detail-%Y%m%d

		#
		#  This MUST be 0600, otherwise anyone can read
		#  the users passwords!
		# detailperm = 0600
	# }

	#
	#  This module logs authentication reply packets sent
	#  to a NAS.  Both Access-Accept and Access-Reject packets
	#  are logged.
	#
	#  You will also need to un-comment the 'reply_log' line
	#  in the 'post-auth' section, below.
	#
	# detail reply_log {
		# detailfile = ${radacctdir}/%{Client-IP-Address}/reply-detail-%Y%m%d

		#
		#  This MUST be 0600, otherwise anyone can read
		#  the users passwords!
		# detailperm = 0600
	# }

	#
	#  This module logs packets proxied to a home server.
	#
	#  You will also need to un-comment the 'pre_proxy_log' line
	#  in the 'pre-proxy' section, below.
	#
	# detail pre_proxy_log {
		# detailfile = ${radacctdir}/%{Client-IP-Address}/pre-proxy-detail-%Y%m%d

		#
		#  This MUST be 0600, otherwise anyone can read
		#  the users passwords!
		# detailperm = 0600
	# }

	#
	#  This module logs response packets from a home server.
	#
	#  You will also need to un-comment the 'post_proxy_log' line
	#  in the 'post-proxy' section, below.
	#
	# detail post_proxy_log {
		# detailfile = ${radacctdir}/%{Client-IP-Address}/post-proxy-detail-%Y%m%d

		#
		#  This MUST be 0600, otherwise anyone can read
		#  the users passwords!
		# detailperm = 0600
	# }

	#
	#  The rlm_sql_log module appends the SQL queries in a log
	#  file which is read later by the radsqlrelay program.
	#
	#  This module only performs the dynamic expansion of the
	#  variables found in the SQL statements. No operation is
	#  executed on the database server. (this could be done
	#  later by an external program) That means the module is
	#  useful only with non-"SELECT" statements.
	#
	#  See rlm_sql_log(5) manpage.
	#
#	sql_log {
#		path = ${radacctdir}/sql-relay
#		acct_table = "radacct"
#		postauth_table = "radpostauth"
#
#		Start = "INSERT INTO ${acct_table} (AcctSessionId, UserName, \
#		 NASIPAddress, FramedIPAddress, AcctStartTime, AcctStopTime, \
#		 AcctSessionTime, AcctTerminateCause) VALUES                 \
#		 ('%{Acct-Session-Id}', '%{User-Name}', '%{NAS-IP-Address}', \
#		 '%{Framed-IP-Address}', '%S', '0', '0', '');"
#		Stop = "INSERT INTO ${acct_table} (AcctSessionId, UserName,  \
#		 NASIPAddress, FramedIPAddress, AcctStartTime, AcctStopTime, \
#		 AcctSessionTime, AcctTerminateCause) VALUES                 \
#		 ('%{Acct-Session-Id}', '%{User-Name}', '%{NAS-IP-Address}', \
#		 '%{Framed-IP-Address}', '0', '%S', '%{Acct-Session-Time}',  \
#		 '%{Acct-Terminate-Cause}');"
#		Alive = "INSERT INTO ${acct_table} (AcctSessionId, UserName, \
#		 NASIPAddress, FramedIPAddress, AcctStartTime, AcctStopTime, \
#		 AcctSessionTime, AcctTerminateCause) VALUES                 \
#		 ('%{Acct-Session-Id}', '%{User-Name}', '%{NAS-IP-Address}', \
#		 '%{Framed-IP-Address}', '0', '0', '%{Acct-Session-Time}','');"
#
#		Post-Auth = "INSERT INTO ${postauth_table}                   \
#		 (user, pass, reply, date) VALUES                            \
#		 ('%{User-Name}', '%{User-Password:-Chap-Password}',         \
#		 '%{reply:Packet-Type}', '%S');"
#	}



	#
	#  Create a unique accounting session Id.  Many NASes re-use
	#  or repeat values for Acct-Session-Id, causing no end of
	#  confusion.
	#
	#  This module will add a (probably) unique session id 
	#  to an accounting packet based on the attributes listed
	#  below found in the packet.  See doc/rlm_acct_unique for
	#  more information.
	#
	acct_unique {
		key = "User-Name, Acct-Session-Id, NAS-IP-Address, Client-IP-Address, NAS-Port"
	}


	#  Include another file that has the SQL-related configuration.
	#  This is another file only because it tends to be big.
	#
	#  The following configuration file is for use with MySQL.
	#
	#  For Postgresql, use:		${confdir}/postgresql.conf
	#  For MS-SQL, use:	 	${confdir}/mssql.conf
	#  For Oracle, use:	 	${confdir}/oraclesql.conf
	#
	#$INCLUDE  ${confdir}/sql.conf


	#  For Cisco VoIP specific accounting with Postgresql,
	#  use:		${confdir}/pgsql-voip.conf
	#
	#  You will also need the sql schema from:
	#  	 src/billing/cisco_h323_db_schema-postgres.sql
	#  Note: This config can be use AS WELL AS the standard sql
	#  config if you need SQL based Auth
	

	#  Write a 'utmp' style file, of which users are currently
	#  logged in, and where they've logged in from.
	#
	#  This file is used mainly for Simultaneous-Use checking,
	#  and also 'radwho', to see who's currently logged in.
	#
	radutmp {
		#  Where the file is stored.  It's not a log file,
		#  so it doesn't need rotating.
		#
		filename = ${logdir}/radutmp

		#  The field in the packet to key on for the
		#  'user' name,  If you have other fields which you want
		#  to use to key on to control Simultaneous-Use,
		#  then you can use them here.
		#
		#  Note, however, that the size of the field in the
		#  'utmp' data structure is small, around 32
		#  characters, so that will limit the possible choices
		#  of keys.
		#
		#  You may want instead: %{Stripped-User-Name:-%{User-Name}}
		username = %{User-Name}


		#  Whether or not we want to treat "user" the same
		#  as "USER", or "User".  Some systems have problems
		#  with case sensitivity, so this should be set to
		#  'no' to enable the comparisons of the key attribute
		#  to be case insensitive.
		#
		case_sensitive = yes

		#  Accounting information may be lost, so the user MAY
		#  have logged off of the NAS, but we haven't noticed.
		#  If so, we can verify this information with the NAS,
		#
		#  If we want to believe the 'utmp' file, then this
		#  configuration entry can be set to 'no'.
		#
		check_with_nas = yes		

		# Set the file permissions, as the contents of this file
		# are usually private.
		perm = 0600

		callerid = "yes"
	}

	# "Safe" radutmp - does not contain caller ID, so it can be
	# world-readable, and radwho can work for normal users, without
	# exposing any information that isn't already exposed by who(1).
	#
	# This is another 'instance' of the radutmp module, but it is given
	# then name "sradutmp" to identify it later in the "accounting"
	# section.
	radutmp sradutmp {
		filename = ${logdir}/sradutmp
		perm = 0644
		callerid = "no"
	}

	# attr_filter - filters the attributes received in replies from
	# proxied servers, to make sure we send back to our RADIUS client
	# only allowed attributes.
	attr_filter {
		attrsfile = ${confdir}/attrs
	}

	#  counter module:
	#  This module takes an attribute (count-attribute).
	#  It also takes a key, and creates a counter for each unique
	#  key.  The count is incremented when accounting packets are
	#  received by the server.  The value of the increment depends
	#  on the attribute type.
	#  If the attribute is Acct-Session-Time or of an integer type we add the
	#  value of the attribute. If it is anything else we increase the
	#  counter by one.
	#
	#  The 'reset' parameter defines when the counters are all reset to
	#  zero.  It can be hourly, daily, weekly, monthly or never.
	#
	#  hourly: Reset on 00:00 of every hour
	#  daily: Reset on 00:00:00 every day
	#  weekly: Reset on 00:00:00 on sunday
	#  monthly: Reset on 00:00:00 of the first day of each month
	#
	#  It can also be user defined. It should be of the form:
	#  num[hdwm] where:
	#  h: hours, d: days, w: weeks, m: months
	#  If the letter is ommited days will be assumed. In example:
	#  reset = 10h (reset every 10 hours)
	#  reset = 12  (reset every 12 days)
	#
	#
	#  The check-name attribute defines an attribute which will be
	#  registered by the counter module and can be used to set the
	#  maximum allowed value for the counter after which the user
	#  is rejected.
	#  Something like:
	#
	#  DEFAULT Max-Daily-Session := 36000
	#          Fall-Through = 1
	#
	#  You should add the counter module in the instantiate
	#  section so that it registers check-name before the files
	#  module reads the users file.
	#
	#  If check-name is set and the user is to be rejected then we
	#  send back a Reply-Message and we log a Failure-Message in
	#  the radius.log
	#  If the count attribute is Acct-Session-Time then on each login
	#  we send back the remaining online time as a Session-Timeout attribute
	#
	#  The counter-name can also be used instead of using the check-name
	#  like below:
	#
	#  DEFAULT  Daily-Session-Time > 3600, Auth-Type = Reject
	#      Reply-Message = "You've used up more than one hour today"
	#
	#  The allowed-servicetype attribute can be used to only take
	#  into account specific sessions. For example if a user first
	#  logs in through a login menu and then selects ppp there will
	#  be two sessions. One for Login-User and one for Framed-User
	#  service type. We only need to take into account the second one.
	#
	#  The module should be added in the instantiate, authorize and
	#  accounting sections.  Make sure that in the authorize
	#  section it comes after any module which sets the
	#  'check-name' attribute.
	#
	counter daily {
		filename = ${raddbdir}/db.daily
		key = User-Name
		count-attribute = Acct-Session-Time
		reset = daily
		counter-name = Daily-Session-Time
		check-name = Max-Daily-Session
		allowed-servicetype = Framed-User
		cache-size = 5000
	}

	#
	#  This module is an SQL enabled version of the counter module.
	#
	#  Rather than maintaining seperate (GDBM) databases of
	#  accounting info for each counter, this module uses the data
	#  stored in the raddacct table by the sql modules. This
	#  module NEVER does any database INSERTs or UPDATEs.  It is
	#  totally dependent on the SQL module to process Accounting
	#  packets.
	#
	#  The 'sqlmod_inst' parameter holds the instance of the sql
	#  module to use when querying the SQL database. Normally it
	#  is just "sql".  If you define more and one SQL module
	#  instance (usually for failover situations), you can
	#  specify which module has access to the Accounting Data
	#  (radacct table).
	#
	#  The 'reset' parameter defines when the counters are all
	#  reset to zero.  It can be hourly, daily, weekly, monthly or
	#  never.  It can also be user defined. It should be of the
	#  form:
	#  	num[hdwm] where:
	#  	h: hours, d: days, w: weeks, m: months
	#  	If the letter is ommited days will be assumed. In example:
	#  	reset = 10h (reset every 10 hours)
	#  	reset = 12  (reset every 12 days)
	#
	#  The 'key' parameter specifies the unique identifier for the
	#  counter records (usually 'User-Name').
	#
	#  The 'query' parameter specifies the SQL query used to get
	#  the current Counter value from the database. There are 3
	#  parameters that can be used in the query:
	#		%k	'key' parameter
	#		%b	unix time value of beginning of reset period
	#		%e	unix time value of end of reset period
	#
	#  The 'check-name' parameter is the name of the 'check'
	#  attribute to use to access the counter in the 'users' file
	#  or SQL radcheck or radcheckgroup tables.
	#
	#  The 'reply-name' parameter is the name the the attribute
	#  which holds the time remaining for the user.  This is normally
	#  Session-Timeout, which makes the NAS disconnect the user
	#  once the session time is up.
	#
	#  DEFAULT  Max-Daily-Session > 3600, Auth-Type = Reject

	#      Reply-Message = "You've used up more than one hour today"
	#
	sqlcounter dailycounter {
		counter-name = Daily-Session-Time
		check-name = Max-Daily-Session
		reply-name = Session-Timeout
		sqlmod-inst = sql
		key = User-Name
		reset = daily

		# This query properly handles calls that span from the
		# previous reset period into the current period but
		# involves more work for the SQL server than those
		# below
		# For mysql:
		query = "SELECT SUM(AcctSessionTime - \
                 GREATEST((%b - UNIX_TIMESTAMP(AcctStartTime)), 0)) \
                 FROM radacct WHERE UserName='%{%k}' AND \
                 UNIX_TIMESTAMP(AcctStartTime) + AcctSessionTime > '%b'"

		# For postgresql:
#		query = "SELECT SUM(AcctSessionTime - \
#                GREATER((%b - AcctStartTime::ABSTIME::INT4), 0)) \
#                FROM radacct WHERE UserName='%{%k}' AND \
#                AcctStartTime::ABSTIME::INT4 + AcctSessionTime > '%b'"

		# This query ignores calls that started in a previous
		# reset period and continue into into this one. But it
		# is a little easier on the SQL server
		# For mysql:
#		query = "SELECT SUM(AcctSessionTime) FROM radacct WHERE \
#                UserName='%{%k}' AND AcctStartTime > FROM_UNIXTIME('%b')"

		# For postgresql:
#		query = "SELECT SUM(AcctSessionTime) FROM radacct WHERE \
#                UserName='%{%k}' AND AND AcctStartTime::ABSTIME::INT4 > '%b'"

		# This query is the same as above, but demonstrates an
		# additional counter parameter '%e' which is the
		# timestamp for the end of the period
		# For mysql:
#		query = "SELECT SUM(AcctSessionTime) FROM radacct \
#                WHERE UserName='%{%k}' AND AcctStartTime BETWEEN \
#                FROM_UNIXTIME('%b') AND FROM_UNIXTIME('%e')"

		# For postgresql:
#		query = "SELECT SUM(AcctSessionTime) FROM radacct \
#                WHERE UserName='%{%k}' AND AcctStartTime::ABSTIME::INT4 \
#                BETWEEN '%b' AND '%e'"
	}

	sqlcounter monthlycounter {
		counter-name = Monthly-Session-Time
		check-name = Max-Monthly-Session
		reply-name = Session-Timeout
		sqlmod-inst = sql
		key = User-Name
		reset = monthly

		# This query properly handles calls that span from the
		# previous reset period into the current period but
		# involves more work for the SQL server than those
		# below
		# The same notes above about the differences between mysql
		# versus postgres queries apply here.
		query = "SELECT SUM(AcctSessionTime - \
                 GREATEST((%b - UNIX_TIMESTAMP(AcctStartTime)), 0)) \
                 FROM radacct WHERE UserName='%{%k}' AND \
                 UNIX_TIMESTAMP(AcctStartTime) + AcctSessionTime > '%b'"

		# This query ignores calls that started in a previous
		# reset period and continue into into this one. But it
		# is a little easier on the SQL server
#		query = "SELECT SUM(AcctSessionTime) FROM radacct WHERE \
#                UserName='%{%k}' AND AcctStartTime > FROM_UNIXTIME('%b')"

		# This query is the same as above, but demonstrates an
		# additional counter parameter '%e' which is the
		# timestamp for the end of the period
#		query = "SELECT SUM(AcctSessionTime) FROM radacct \
#                WHERE UserName='%{%k}' AND AcctStartTime BETWEEN \
#                FROM_UNIXTIME('%b') AND FROM_UNIXTIME('%e')"
	}

	#
	# The "always" module is here for debugging purposes. Each
	# instance simply returns the same result, always, without
	# doing anything.
	always fail {
		rcode = fail
	}
	always reject {
		rcode = reject
	}
	always ok {
		rcode = ok
		simulcount = 0
		mpp = no
	}

	#
	#  The 'expression' module currently has no configuration.
	#
	#  This module is useful only for 'xlat'.  To use it,
	#  put 'exec' into the 'instantiate' section.  You can then
	#  do dynamic translation of attributes like:
	#
	#  Attribute-Name = `%{expr:2 + 3 + %{exec: uid -u}}`
	#
	#  The value of the attribute will be replaced with the output
	#  of the program which is executed.  Due to RADIUS protocol
	#  limitations, any output over 253 bytes will be ignored.
	expr {
	}

	#
	#  The 'digest' module currently has no configuration.
	#
	#  "Digest" authentication against a Cisco SIP server.
	#  See 'doc/rfc/draft-sterman-aaa-sip-00.txt' for details
	#  on performing digest authentication for Cisco SIP servers.
	#
	digest {
	}

	#
	#  Execute external programs
	#
	#  This module is useful only for 'xlat'.  To use it,
	#  put 'exec' into the 'instantiate' section.  You can then
	#  do dynamic translation of attributes like:
	#
	#  Attribute-Name = `%{exec:/path/to/program args}`
	#
	#  The value of the attribute will be replaced with the output
	#  of the program which is executed.  Due to RADIUS protocol
	#  limitations, any output over 253 bytes will be ignored.
	#
	#  The RADIUS attributes from the user request will be placed
	#  into environment variables of the executed program, as
	#  described in 'doc/variables.txt'
	#
	exec {
		wait = yes
		input_pairs = request
	}

	#
	#  This is a more general example of the execute module.
	#
	#  This one is called "echo".
	#
	#  Attribute-Name = `%{echo:/path/to/program args}`
	#
	#  If you wish to execute an external program in more than
	#  one section (e.g. 'authorize', 'pre_proxy', etc), then it
	#  is probably best to define a different instance of the
	#  'exec' module for every section.	
	#	
	exec echo {
		#
		#  Wait for the program to finish.
		#
		#  If we do NOT wait, then the program is "fire and
		#  forget", and any output attributes from it are ignored.
		#
		#  If we are looking for the program to output
		#  attributes, and want to add those attributes to the
		#  request, then we MUST wait for the program to
		#  finish, and therefore set 'wait=yes'
		#
		# allowed values: {no, yes}
		wait = yes

		#
		#  The name of the program to execute, and it's
		#  arguments.  Dynamic translation is done on this
		#  field, so things like the following example will
		#  work.
		#
		program = "/bin/echo %{User-Name}"

		#
		#  The attributes which are placed into the
		#  environment variables for the program.
		#
		#  Allowed values are:
		#
		#	request		attributes from the request
		#	config		attributes from the configuration items list
		#	reply		attributes from the reply
		#	proxy-request	attributes from the proxy request
		#	proxy-reply	attributes from the proxy reply
		#
		#  Note that some attributes may not exist at some
		#  stages.  e.g. There may be no proxy-reply
		#  attributes if this module is used in the
		#  'authorize' section.
		#
		input_pairs = request

		#
		#  Where to place the output attributes (if any) from
		#  the executed program.  The values allowed, and the
		#  restrictions as to availability, are the same as
		#  for the input_pairs.
		#
		output_pairs = reply

		#
		#  When to execute the program.  If the packet
		#  type does NOT match what's listed here, then
		#  the module does NOT execute the program.
		#
		#  For a list of allowed packet types, see
		#  the 'dictionary' file, and look for VALUEs
		#  of the Packet-Type attribute.
		#
		#  By default, the module executes on ANY packet.
		#  Un-comment out the following line to tell the
		#  module to execute only if an Access-Accept is
		#  being sent to the NAS.
		#
		#packet_type = Access-Accept
	}

	#  Do server side ip pool management. Should be added in post-auth and
	#  accounting sections.
	#
	#  The module also requires the existance of the Pool-Name
	#  attribute. That way the administrator can add the Pool-Name
	#  attribute in the user profiles and use different pools
	#  for different users. The Pool-Name attribute is a *check* item not
	#  a reply item.
	#
	# Example:
	# radiusd.conf: ippool students { [...] }
	# users file  : DEFAULT Group == students, Pool-Name := "students"
	#
	# ********* IF YOU CHANGE THE RANGE PARAMETERS YOU MUST *********
	# ********* THEN ERASE THE DB FILES                     *********
	#
	ippool main_pool {

		#  range-start,range-stop: The start and end ip
		#  addresses for the ip pool
		range-start = 192.168.1.1
		range-stop = 192.168.3.254

		#  netmask: The network mask used for the ip's

		netmask = 255.255.255.0

		#  cache-size: The gdbm cache size for the db
		#  files. Should be equal to the number of ip's
		#  available in the ip pool
		cache-size = 800

		# session-db: The main db file used to allocate ip's to clients
		session-db = ${raddbdir}/db.ippool

		# ip-index: Helper db index file used in multilink
		ip-index = ${raddbdir}/db.ipindex

		# override: Will this ippool override a Framed-IP-Address already set
		override = no

		# maximum-timeout: If not zero specifies the maximum time in seconds an
		# entry may be active. Default: 0
		maximum-timeout = 0
	}

	# $INCLUDE  ${confdir}/sqlippool.conf
	# $INCLUDE  ${confdir}/postgresqlippool.conf

	# OTP token support.  Not included by default.
	# $INCLUDE  ${confdir}/otp.conf

}

# Instantiation
#
#  This section orders the loading of the modules.  Modules
#  listed here will get loaded BEFORE the later sections like
#  authorize, authenticate, etc. get examined.
#
#  This section is not strictly needed.  When a section like
#  authorize refers to a module, it's automatically loaded and
#  initialized.  However, some modules may not be listed in any
#  of the following sections, so they can be listed here.
#
#  Also, listing modules here ensures that you have control over
#  the order in which they are initalized.  If one module needs
#  something defined by another module, you can list them in order
#  here, and ensure that the configuration will be OK.
#
instantiate {
	#
	#  Allows the execution of external scripts.
	#  The entire command line (and output) must fit into 253 bytes.
	#
	#  e.g. Framed-Pool = `%{exec:/bin/echo foo}`
	exec

	#
	#  The expression module doesn't do authorization,
	#  authentication, or accounting.  It only does dynamic
	#  translation, of the form:
	#
	#	Session-Timeout = `%{expr:2 + 3}`
	#
	#  So the module needs to be instantiated, but CANNOT be
	#  listed in any other section.  See 'doc/rlm_expr' for
	#  more information.
	#
	expr

	#
	# We add the counter module here so that it registers
	# the check-name attribute before any module which sets
	# it
#	daily
}

#  Authorization. First preprocess (hints and huntgroups files),
#  then realms, and finally look in the "users" file.
#
#  The order of the realm modules will determine the order that
#  we try to find a matching realm.
#
#  Make *sure* that 'preprocess' comes before any realm if you 
#  need to setup hints for the remote radius server
authorize {
	#
	#  The preprocess module takes care of sanitizing some bizarre
	#  attributes in the request, and turning them into attributes
	#  which are more standard.
	#
	#  It takes care of processing the 'raddb/hints' and the
	#  'raddb/huntgroups' files.
	#
	#  It also adds the %{Client-IP-Address} attribute to the request.
	preprocess

	#
	#  If you want to have a log of authentication requests,
	#  un-comment the following line, and the 'detail auth_log'
	#  section, above.
#	auth_log
	
#	attr_filter

	#
	#  The chap module will set 'Auth-Type := CHAP' if we are
	#  handling a CHAP request and Auth-Type has not already been set
	chap

	#
	#  If the users are logging in with an MS-CHAP-Challenge
	#  attribute for authentication, the mschap module will find
	#  the MS-CHAP-Challenge attribute, and add 'Auth-Type := MS-CHAP'
	#  to the request, which will cause the server to then use
	#  the mschap module for authentication.
	mschap

	#
	#  If you have a Cisco SIP server authenticating against
	#  FreeRADIUS, uncomment the following line, and the 'digest'
	#  line in the 'authenticate' section.
#	digest

	#
	#  Look for IPASS style 'realm/', and if not found, look for
	#  '@realm', and decide whether or not to proxy, based on
	#  that.
#	IPASS

	#
	#  If you are using multiple kinds of realms, you probably
	#  want to set "ignore_null = yes" for all of them.
	#  Otherwise, when the first style of realm doesn't match,
	#  the other styles won't be checked.
	#
	suffix
#	ntdomain

	#
	#  This module takes care of EAP-MD5, EAP-TLS, and EAP-LEAP
	#  authentication.
	#
	#  It also sets the EAP-Type attribute in the request
	#  attribute list to the EAP type from the packet.
	eap

	#
	#  Read the 'users' file
	files

	#
	#  Look in an SQL database.  The schema of the database
	#  is meant to mirror the "users" file.
	#
	#  See "Authorization Queries" in sql.conf
#	sql

	#
	#  If you are using /etc/smbpasswd, and are also doing
	#  mschap authentication, the un-comment this line, and
	#  configure the 'etc_smbpasswd' module, above.
#	etc_smbpasswd

	#
	#  The ldap module will set Auth-Type to LDAP if it has not
	#  already been set
	company1

	
	#
	#  Enforce daily limits on time spent logged in.
#	daily

	#
	# Use the checkval module
#	checkval

	#
	# As of 1.1.4, you should list "pap" last in this section.
	# See "man rlm_pap" for more information.
	pap
}


#  Authentication.
#
#
#  This section lists which modules are available for authentication.
#  Note that it does NOT mean 'try each module in order'.  It means
#  that a module from the 'authorize' section adds a configuration
#  attribute 'Auth-Type := FOO'.  That authentication type is then
#  used to pick the apropriate module from the list below.
#

#  In general, you SHOULD NOT set the Auth-Type attribute.  The server
#  will figure it out on its own, and will do the right thing.  The
#  most common side effect of erroneously setting the Auth-Type
#  attribute is that one authentication method will work, but the
#  others will not.
#
#  The common reasons to set the Auth-Type attribute by hand
#  is to either forcibly reject the user, or forcibly accept him.
#
authenticate {
	#
	#  PAP authentication, when a back-end database listed
	#  in the 'authorize' section supplies a password.  The
	#  password can be clear-text, or encrypted.
	Auth-Type PAP {
		pap
	}

	#
	#  Most people want CHAP authentication
	#  A back-end database listed in the 'authorize' section
	#  MUST supply a CLEAR TEXT password.  Encrypted passwords
	#  won't work.
	Auth-Type CHAP {
		chap
	}

	#
	#  MSCHAP authentication.
	Auth-Type MS-CHAP {
		mschap
	}

	#
	#  If you have a Cisco SIP server authenticating against
	#  FreeRADIUS, uncomment the following line, and the 'digest'
	#  line in the 'authorize' section.
#	digest

	#
	#  Pluggable Authentication Modules.
#	pam

	#
	#  See 'man getpwent' for information on how the 'unix'
	#  module checks the users password.  Note that packets
	#  containing CHAP-Password attributes CANNOT be authenticated
	#  against /etc/passwd!  See the FAQ for details.
	#  
	unix

	# Uncomment it if you want to use ldap for authentication
	#
	# Note that this means "check plain-text password against
	# the ldap database", which means that EAP won't work,
	# as it does not supply a plain-text password.
#	Auth-Type LDAP {
#		ldap
#	}

	#
	#  Allow EAP authentication.
	eap
}


#
#  Pre-accounting.  Decide which accounting type to use.
#
preacct {
	preprocess

	#
	#  Ensure that we have a semi-unique identifier for every
	#  request, and many NAS boxes are broken.
	acct_unique

	#
	#  Look for IPASS-style 'realm/', and if not found, look for
	#  '@realm', and decide whether or not to proxy, based on
	#  that.
	#
	#  Accounting requests are generally proxied to the same
	#  home server as authentication requests.
#	IPASS
	suffix
#	ntdomain

	#
	#  Read the 'acct_users' file
	files
}

#
#  Accounting.  Log the accounting data.
#
accounting {
	#
	#  Create a 'detail'ed log of the packets.
	#  Note that accounting requests which are proxied
	#  are also logged in the detail file.
	detail
#	daily

	#  Update the wtmp file
	#
	#  If you don't use "radlast", you can delete this line.
	unix

	#
	#  For Simultaneous-Use tracking.
	#
	#  Due to packet losses in the network, the data here
	#  may be incorrect.  There is little we can do about it.
	radutmp
#	sradutmp

	#  Return an address to the IP Pool when we see a stop record.
#	main_pool
#	sqlippool

	#
	#  Log traffic to an SQL database.
	#
	#  See "Accounting queries" in sql.conf
#	sql

	#
	#  Instead of sending the query to the SQL server,
	#  write it into a log file.
	#
#	sql_log

	#  Cisco VoIP specific bulk accounting
#	pgsql-voip


}



#  Session database, used for checking Simultaneous-Use. Either the radutmp 
#  or rlm_sql module can handle this.
#  The rlm_sql module is *much* faster
session {
	radutmp

	#
	#  See "Simultaneous Use Checking Querie" in sql.conf
#	sql
}


#  Post-Authentication
#  Once we KNOW that the user has been authenticated, there are
#  additional steps we can take.
post-auth {
	#  Get an address from the IP Pool.
#	main_pool
#	sqlippool

	#
	#  If you want to have a log of authentication replies,
	#  un-comment the following line, and the 'detail reply_log'
	#  section, above.
#	reply_log

	#
	#  After authenticating the user, do another SQL query.
	#
	#  See "Authentication Logging Queries" in sql.conf
#	sql

	#
	#  Instead of sending the query to the SQL server,
	#  write it into a log file.
	#
#	sql_log

	#
	#  Un-comment the following if you have set
	#  'edir_account_policy_check = yes' in the ldap module sub-section of
	#  the 'modules' section.
	#
        company1
	
	#
	#  Access-Reject packets are sent through the REJECT sub-section of the
	#  post-auth section.
	#  Uncomment the following and set the module name to the ldap instance
	#  name if you have set 'edir_account_policy_check = yes' in the ldap
	#  module sub-section of the 'modules' section.
	#
	Post-Auth-Type REJECT {
                       company1
	}
}

#
#  When the server decides to proxy a request to a home server,
#  the proxied request is first passed through the pre-proxy
#  stage.  This stage can re-write the request, or decide to
#  cancel the proxy.
#
#  Only a few modules currently have this method.
#
pre-proxy {
#	attr_rewrite

	#  Uncomment the following line if you want to change attributes
	#  as defined in the preproxy_users file.
#	files

	#  If you want to have a log of packets proxied to a home
	#  server, un-comment the following line, and the
	#  'detail pre_proxy_log' section, above.
#	pre_proxy_log
}

#
#  When the server receives a reply to a request it proxied
#  to a home server, the request may be massaged here, in the
#  post-proxy stage.
#
post-proxy {

	#  If you want to have a log of replies from a home server,
	#  un-comment the following line, and the 'detail post_proxy_log'
	#  section, above.
#	post_proxy_log

#	attr_rewrite

	#  Uncomment the following line if you want to filter replies from
	#  remote proxies based on the rules defined in the 'attrs' file.

#	attr_filter

	#
	#  If you are proxying LEAP, you MUST configure the EAP
	#  module, and you MUST list it here, in the post-proxy
	#  stage.
	#
	#  You MUST also use the 'nostrip' option in the 'realm'
	#  configuration.  Otherwise, the User-Name attribute
	#  in the proxied request will not match the user name
	#  hidden inside of the EAP packet, and the end server will
	#  reject the EAP request.
	#
	eap
}

Bestanden kopiëren naar de radius server

Hernoem (/etc/raddb) radiusd.conf, eap.conf, clients.conf en users naar “bestandsnaam_old” Kopiëer de nieuwe radiusd.conf, eap.conf en clients.conf naar /etc/raddb Maak een nieuw en leeg users bestand aan: touch users Kopiëer (/etc/raddb/certs) random naar /etc/ssl/company Kopiëer de dh, rootcert.b64, rootcert.pem en servercert.pem naar /etc/ssl/company

Radius starten

radiusd -X

Radius testen

radtest gebruiker wachtwoord 127.0.0.1:1812 1812 testing123

PAM LDAP inrichten voor openSUSE

Installatie pam_radius

Grafisch inloggen en geef het commando:

yast2 -i pam_radius

Radius server gegevens

server file:

#  pam_radius_auth configuration file.  Copy to: /etc/raddb/server
#
#  For proper security, this file SHOULD have permissions 0600,
#  that is readable by root, and NO ONE else.  If anyone other than
#  root can read this file, then they can spoof responses from the server!
#
#  There are 3 fields per line in this file.  There may be multiple
#  lines.  Blank lines or lines beginning with '#' are treated as
#  comments, and are ignored.  The fields are:
#
#  server[:port] secret [timeout]
#
#  the port name or number is optional.  The default port name is
#  "radius", and is looked up from /etc/services The timeout field is
#  optional.  The default timeout is 3 seconds.
#
#  If multiple RADIUS server lines exist, they are tried in order.  The
#  first server to return success or failure causes the module to return
#  success or failure.  Only if a server fails to response is it skipped,
#  and the next server in turn is used.
#
#  The timeout field controls how many seconds the module waits before
#  deciding that the server has failed to respond.
#
# server[:port]	shared_secret      timeout (s)
127.0.0.1	secret             1
192.168.177.100	testing1234        6

#
# having localhost in your radius configuration is a Good Thing.
#
# See the INSTALL file for pam.conf hints.

Services configureren voor radius

sshd

sshd file:

#%PAM-1.0
auth     sufficient     /lib/security/pam_radius_auth.so
auth	 requisite	pam_nologin.so
auth     include        common-auth
account  include        common-account
password include        common-password
# mkhomedir gebruikt /etc/skel voor het maken van de nieuwe dir
session  required       pam_mkhomedir.so silent
session	 required	pam_loginuid.so
session  include        common-session
# Enable the following line to get resmgr support for
# ssh sessions (see /usr/share/doc/packages/resmgr/README)
session  optional	pam_resmgr.so fake_ttyname

gdm

gdm file:

#%PAM-1.0
auth     sufficient     /lib/security/pam_radius_auth.so
auth     include        common-auth
account  include        common-account
password include        common-password
# mkhomedir gebruikt /etc/skel voor het maken van de nieuwe dir
session  required       pam_mkhomedir.so silent
session  required       pam_loginuid.so
session  include        common-session
session  required       pam_resmgr.so

other

other file:

#%PAM-1.0
#Default - Warn first - Then deny
#pam_warn _allways_ returns a pam ignore
#pam_warn logs evrything to syslog
#On secure systems, like in your local network you could do:
# auth     required       pam_unix.so
# account  required       pam_unix.so
# etc
auth	 required	pam_warn.so
auth	 required	pam_deny.so
account  required	pam_warn.so
account	 required	pam_deny.so
password required	pam_warn.so
password required	pam_deny.so
session  required       pam_warn.so
session	 required	pam_deny.so

nologin

Indien een service file hiernaar verwijst kan er alleen nog worden ingelogd via radius voor die desbetreffende service nologin file:

Indien deze file bestaat, kunnen gebruikers niet gebruik maken van UNIX authenticatie.
Dit heeft geen invloed op de gebruiker root, die de inhoud van deze file altijd te zien krijgt.
Indien gebruikers wel gebruik moeten maken van UNIX authenticatie moet deze file (/etc/nologin)
hernoemd worden.

Password less configuratie voor sudo

sudoers file:

# sudoers file.
#
# This file MUST be edited with the 'visudo' command as root.
#
# See the sudoers man page for the details on how to write a sudoers file.
#

# Host alias specification

# User alias specification

# Cmnd alias specification

# Defaults specification

# Prevent environment variables from influencing programs in an
# unexpected or harmful way (CVE-2005-2959, CVE-2005-4158, CVE-2006-0151)
Defaults always_set_home
Defaults env_reset

Defaults env_keep = "LANG LC_ADDRESS LC_CTYPE LC_COLLATE LC_IDENTIFICATION LC_MEASUREMENT LC_MESSAGES LC_MONETARY LC_NAME LC_NUMERIC LC_PAPER LC_TELEPHONE LC_TIME LC_ALL LANGUAGE LINGUAS XDG_SESSION_COOKIE"
# Comment out the preceding line and uncomment the following one if you need
# to use special input methods. This may allow users to compromise  the root
# account if they are allowed to run commands without authentication.
#Defaults env_keep = "LANG LC_ADDRESS LC_CTYPE LC_COLLATE LC_IDENTIFICATION LC_MEASUREMENT LC_MESSAGES LC_MONETARY LC_NAME LC_NUMERIC LC_PAPER LC_TELEPHONE LC_TIME LC_ALL LANGUAGE LINGUAS XDG_SESSION_COOKIE XMODIFIERS GTK_IM_MODULE QT_IM_MODULE QT_IM_SWITCHER"

# In the default (unconfigured) configuration, sudo asks for the root password.
# This allows use of an ordinary user account for administration of a freshly
# installed system. When configuring sudo, delete the two


# following lines:
# Defaults targetpw   # ask for the password of the target user i.e. root
# ALL ALL=(ALL) ALL   # WARNING! Only use this together with 'Defaults targetpw'!

# Runas alias specification

# User privilege specification
root	ALL=(ALL) SETENV: ALL
gebruiker ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD: SETENV: ALL

# Uncomment to allow people in group wheel to run all commands
# and set environment variables.
# %wheel	ALL=(ALL) SETENV: ALL

# Same thing without a password
# %wheel	ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD: SETENV: ALL

# Samples
# %users  ALL=/sbin/mount /cdrom,/sbin/umount /cdrom
# %users  localhost=/sbin/shutdown -h now

Opmerkingen: 1. Linux login werkt alleen indien de gebruiker al bestaat, is niet erg, gebruiker moet toch worden toegevoegd aan de sudoers file 2. Het lokale wachtwoord wordt niet bijgewerkt, is niet erg, voorkomt dat gebruikers kunnen inloggen met services die niet zijn geconfigureerd

Testen

Kan het wachtwoord worden aangepast en wat is het gevolg daarvan

Bij het geven van het commando passwd wordt gevraagd om het lokale wachtwoord. Indien deze onbekend is kan deze ook niet veranderd worden. Door het toevoegen van de volgende regel aan /etc/pam.d/passwd

         password sufficient     /lib/security/pam_radius_auth.so

kun je zorgen dat de initiële authenticatie voor passwd via radius gaat. Radius ondersteund echter niet dat er een wachtwoord wordt aangepast. Melding: Deprecated password change request from client client:4595 - ID 101 : IGNORED

Indien een service pam niet ondersteund, kun je dan inloggen met je lokale account, en wat gebeurt er indien je je wachtwoord dan aanpast

Een niet geconfigureerde service zal radius niet aanspreken en de normale authenticatie wijze gebruiken.

Wat indien de account disabled is

Op het moment dat de gebruiker disabled wordt, worden actieve connecties niet gekilled Nieuwe inlogpogingen worden niet toegestaan, hierbij is er geen nette melding. Indien radius in x-mode draait krijg je deze melding: “NDS error: log account expired (-220)” In de syslog wordt een authentication failed gelogd

Intruder lockout policy

eDirectory en Radius lockouts respecteren elkaar, worden bij elkaar opgeteld. Nieuwe inlogpogingen worden niet toegestaan zodra een account locked out is, hierbij is er geen nette melding. Indien radius in x-mode draait krijg je deze melding: NDS error: login lockout (-197) Na een kwartier is de account weer OK en kan er ingelogd worden Als intruder address is het IP-adres van de radius server te zien, in het radius log is te zien vanuit welk IP adres het verzoek is gedaan

Account verlopen

Expiration date ingesteld Nieuwe inlogpogingen worden niet toegestaan zodra een account verlopen is, hierbij is er geen nette melding. Indien radius in x-mode draait krijg je deze melding: NDS error: log account expired (-220)

Wachtwoord verlopen, wat gebeurd er met grace logins

Wachtwoord policy aangepast voor grace logins en password expiration Bij logins op zowel pam_radius als novell client gaat er netjes een grace login vanaf Nieuwe inlogpogingen worden niet toegestaan zodra de grace logins verlopen zijn, hierbij is er geen nette melding. Indien radius in x-mode draait krijg je deze melding: “NDS error: bad password (-222)

Concurrent logins

Het limiteren van het aantal gelijktijdige verbindingen wordt niet gehonoreerd door pam_radius

Time Restrictions

Nieuwe inlogpogingen worden niet toegestaan indien een account niet mag inloggen qua tijd, hierbij is er geen nette melding. Indien radius in x-mode draait krijg je deze melding: NDS error: bad login time or Q halted (-218)

Network Address Restrictions

Het limiteren van het werkstation op IP-adres niveau wordt niet gehonoreerd door pam_radius

DialupAccess op FALSE

Gedaan via ConsoleOne en iManager Inloggen via pam_radius is niet meer mogelijk Indien radius in x-mode draait krijg je deze melding: dialup access disabled

Wat indien eDirectory down is

Inloggen met eDirectory credentials is niet mogelijk Indien radius in x-mode draait krijg je deze melding: could not start TLS Can't contact LDAP server Het ooit ingestelde lokale wachtwoord van de gebruiker werkt wel.

Wat indien radius niet werkt

Inloggen met eDirectory credentials is niet mogelijk Het ooit ingestelde lokale wachtwoord van de gebruiker werkt wel.

Winscp

Inloggen met winscp werkt, zelfde restricties als normaal

Wat als je grafisch inlogt?

su werkt sudo werkt, maar je kan er bijvoorbeeld niet de grafische versie van yast2 mee opstarten, wel de commandline yast versie

Wat wordt er gelogd

Bij het inloggen zie je de poging en het resultaat Bij su zie de poging en het resultaat Bij sudo zie je de poging en het commando wat wordt uitgevoerd

Overige info

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edirectoryfreeradius.txt · Last modified: 2013/04/30 15:30 by sjoerd